• Megan Maley

#SlowFashionSeason

Updated: May 27



Okay so I randomly started a daily outfit account on Instagram several weeks ago. I was perusing IG eager to be entertained like I normally do (unhealthy habit, I know... whatevs.)... and I stumbled upon this sustainable fashion account called @uncomplicatedspaces and I was floored by how simple and beautiful this grid was. The account owner, named Gillian, is a sustainable fashion advocate and just a mindful human in general (and somehow way more fashionable than 99% of people even though she wears the same thing over and over). Her grid was so pleasing to the eye and consistent... it really inspired me to try to re-create her approach to fashion in my own way. Thus, @notatrendycloset was born out of the idea that I would shop and reshop my own closet, all whilst mindfully adding curated, second-hand pieces to my existing wardrobe. I would document my outfits on my own grid in my own unique way and slowly begin to pare my wardrobe down into something simple and beautiful and sustainable.


Meanwhile, I have discovered hundreds of humans who are doing the exact same thing and documenting their journey on Instagram. One account in particular, @slowfashionseason, has petitioned users to commit to 90 days of not buying any new clothes. Slow fashion, the opposite of fast-fashion, is a general term used to refer to clothing that is made in a sustainable and ethical way, by humans who make a fair wage and work under humane and appropriate working conditions, who are not forced or coerced or underage, and are built using fabrics which are sustainable in production, quality, and are sourced from environmentally-friendly, renewable resources and have a low, non-toxic and non-harmful long-term impact to the planet and the environment. Slow fashion is a term that also incorporates the practice of re-wearing and re-purposing garments you already own and purchasing second-hand clothing which will help reduce the waste footprint of fast-fashion, in addition to (generally) supporting charity shops and individuals who sell it.


To be perfectly real, I need new clothes like I need a hole in the head. My closet is packed with things I already love. But I am working to slowly build a more curated and intentional wardrobe that suits my current life. So much of what I hang onto is aspirational (meaning it suits situations or events or a body I only aspire to attend or attain). So much of what I keep is tied to memories. And there's a huge chunk of stuff I own that is comfortable and practical for my daily life, but not very flattering. So the goal is to align my wardrobe with my current body needs, my current life status, and be flattering, cohesive and intentional in the meantime (of course all whilst not buying anything new).


I recognize that clothes don't make the (wo)man, but clothes can make us feel pretty and confident. Clothes can portray the way you feel to the world around you. Clothes are an expression of your mind and thoughts and personality. For these reasons, they matter. Furthermore, how they are acquired matters. If your clothing portrays your personality to the world, your procurement channel conveys your values... even if it isn't overtly communicated. Our small choices, collectively, make a huge impact on the world around us.


For all these reasons, I have committed to a #slowfashionseason. The movement has exceeded the 10k participant threshold needed to bring it to life. If you want to learn more or sign up, here is the website. You can also learn more on the @slowfashionseason Instagram account and follow along for the ride. (Slow Fashion Season runs from June 21st through September 21st. Participants are allowed to purchase clothing second-hand and trade clothing.)


Until next time, be well, friends!

-M

The Journey of Less

c/o Megan Maley

P.O. Box 844

Occoquan, VA 22125

megan.a.maley@gmail.com

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